Orogold 24K Deep Peeling. Cosmetic quackery?

Posted by Lipglossiping On July - 22 - 2013

If you’ve been following me for a little while, you may already know my thoughts on the use of gold in skincare.  Ultimately, I believe it’s an addition that’s far more beneficial to the marketers than the end user… it’s not a mineral enriched with healing properties, it’s a metal, prized for its stability and inertia.  But boy, does it pack some prestige and “luxury” into a product, no?

I was sent a beautifully packaged 24K Deep Peeling gel from Orogold Cosmetics for review… it really is a rather splendid thing.  Priced at £100… I guess it should be.

Orogold Cosmetics 24k Peeling_1

Orogold Cosmetics 24k Peeling_2

The heavyweight packaging, embossed font, and satin-lined box all scream luxury… living up to its placement and price tag.  But what about the product inside?  What are its claims and does it live up to them?

Orogold Cosmetics 24k Peeling_3

Orogold Cosmetics 24K Deep Peeling is an exfoliating product that promises to remove a thin layer of dead skin cells to “reveal ultra-smooth and youthful skin”.  It is recommended to be used once a week with a “sweeping circular motion over skin until you feel the dirt forming”.  Oddly, there is no mention on the website of the 24k gold that this product contains.  Considering that this is such a selling-point and no doubt a price justification… I’m surprised to see that the brand have omitted this information online.

So, what about this gold?  Is it there, do you need a microscope to detect it?  Well, no actually…

Orogold Cosmetics 24k Peeling_4

Orogold Cosmetics 24k Peeling_5

Each pot of Orogold 24K Deep Peeling comes with its own certificate of authenticity (I told you the packaging was good).  The certificate proclaims that the product contains pure 24K gold from Italy.  And you know, it really does… it contains food-grade gold leaf.  Very pretty to look at but at that size, unlikely to have any impact on your skin.  You’d need pores the size of moon-craters to benefit from any of its so-called properties.

To put it another way, the thickness of gold leaf is rated at around 125nm and anything rated above 40nm has been shown not to be able to penetrate deeper than the upper 1/5 layer of the epidermis.  This gold ain’t going nowhere except down the plug-hole.

Orogold Cosmetics 24k Peeling_6

But you know, pretty….

Orogold Cosmetics 24k Peeling_7

So, I’m obviously not convinced by the gold.  But what about the peeling?  How about the exfoliation?

Orogold-24k-Peeling-Reaction

See the picture above?  That’s the “dirt formation” you will feel after rubbing the product into your skin for a few moments.   It’s not dirt… it’s not your dead skin cells being sloughed off… it’s the product’s chemistry reacting with the massage motion you use to apply it.  This isn’t a new thing… many products, particularly those in the Asian market exfoliate skin using this method.  It’s pretty cute… let me explain how it works…

To create this kind of “balling up” upon application, you need to create a chemical reaction on the skin.  Two such ingredients that will create this effect are: cetrimonium chloride and carbomer… both of which are present and correct in Orogold’s 24K Deep Peeling.  Clever huh?

Now just because I’ve (semi) explained the science behind the “magic” doesn’t mean that it’s all smoke and mirrors.  Those little flakey bits will actually help to gently exfoliate your skin as you massage them over your face and let’s not forget the other ingredients contained within the exfoliator, namely: tocopheryl acetate (vit e), ascorbic acid (vit c), and glycerin… all of which will indeed help to smoothe and soften the top layer of the skin.  That being said, it’s a very gentle exfoliation and I’m not sure how effective it would be in the long term if used only once a week as per their direction on the website.

All in all, Orogold 24k Deep Peeling is an exfoliator that works to errr, exfoliate.  I won’t deny that it feels nice on the skin, looks the business in the pot, and leaves my skin feeling soft but… is it worth £100 of your hard-earned cash?  I wouldn’t pay more than £10 for it – gold or no gold.

Orogold 24k Deep Peeling is available to buy instore from one of Orogold Cosmetic’s London boutiques or online from oro-gold.co.uk

* press sample


Pukka Nourishing Brightener

Posted by Lipglossiping On October - 19 - 2012

Let’s get this straight… Pukka Nourishing Brightener smells like it needs to go in a curry. It looks like it needs to go in a curry and if I sneeze whilst standing too closely to it, chances are, it will end up in a curry. It’s aromatic in the extreme, horrendously messy to work with, and an eternally bemusing thing to put on your face.

That said, it’s bloody brilliant.

I don’t think I’ve actually ever used anything in 3/4 years of beauty blogging that’s had such an instant effect on my skin.  Long-lasting effects?  Well, I don’t know about that but in terms of the skincare miracle that you’d want to apply before a big night out for a glowing complexion?  Well, I think I might have found mine.

I don’t even know what it actually is… Pukka say that it’s got Amla and Gotu Kola in it.  Say what?

I mean, how can this little pot (and you don’t get an awful lot for your money) of… of… what looks like the scrapings off your burnt toast (sorry Pukka) coax my parched skin into such a glow?  It’s like a post-facial glow but without all the steaming, blackhead extraction (the blackheads are still there unfortunately), and skin pummeling.

Simply mix a little bit into your usual cleanser (I use a creamy one like A-Derma Sensifluid Cleansing Lotion), rub it in a bit (technical term) and then rinse off with a warm flannel.  HELL-O GLO!

Pukka Nourishing Brightener is priced at £13.00 for 15g and available online from PukkaHerbs.com – it’s probably awful in a curry.

* press sample

What do The Grand Canyon, The Aswan Dam, my blackheads and the Great Pyramids all have in common?  All totally visible from space.

I’ve been reliably informed that my unwanted facial potholes have often been mistaken by the Mars Rover as an interplanetary field of black holes, thoroughly capable of sucking all living matter within a 1000 mile radius into them.

Sounds about right to be honest.

I’ve been trying a daily scrub from Neutrogena which promises to help eradicate these ‘orrible blighters and although it’s early days, I’ve been pretty impressed with the results so far.

There are a billion blackhead-busting scrubs out there but what makes this one a little bit different is the fact that instead of being advised to use it only a couple of times a week, Neutrogena have formulated this one gently enough to be used every day as a replacement to your usual cleanser.

The key ingredients which should make all the difference to our beloved blackheads in this instance is 2% salicylic acid.  A rather brilliant beta hydroxy acid which helps break down congestion deep inside the pore – and used regularly (which you can with this scrub) – will help keep pores free from debris.  Combine this with the manual exfoliation and massage provided by the synthetic microbeads, and it’s a pretty decent way to encourage clogged pores to remain clear.

The eagle-eyed amongst you will also notice that the Neutrogena Visibly Clear Blackhead Eliminating Daily Scrub contains no SLS, and as a result, doesn’t foam much.  The wonderful side-effect of this, for me at least, is that I don’t have to run screaming from the bathroom in a dash to slather moisturiser on my rapidly-tightening face.  I find it a touch drying but nothing that would stop me from using this daily.

Because of the salicylic acid, I’ve actually been leaving this on my skin a little longer than you may expect in order to give the chemical the best chance at having an effect on my deep-space-nine (billion) blackheads.  I’m not the biggest fan of the microbeads because they feel a little granular to me and not quite as smooth as I’d like but I’ve been gently rubbing them in a circular motion around the sides of my nose (area of most congestion) and then leaving the product on my face for a couple of minutes before rinsing my skin clean.

I’ve noticed an improvement in the appearance of my blackheads, especially the larger ones… which I suspect, are the ones that are probably the easiest to flush out.  I’m not sure that I love using the product enough to use it daily for like the. rest. of. my. life.  It smells kinda unpleasant…. in a medicinal way but I’ll definitely reach for it often when I notice those little alien heads peeping out of my pores.

Beam me up spotty.

Neutrogena Visibly Clear Blackhead Eliminating Daily Scrub is currently on offer at Superdrug, priced at £2.34 – definitely worth a punt for those among us who are blackhead-affilicted!

Got blackheads?  How do you bust them?

Limited Edition Elemis Papaya Enzyme Peel

Posted by Lipglossiping On July - 3 - 2012

Nana called, she wants her curtains back and she can’t get ITV any more.

I just don’t know… I mean, I’m not into design and I’m just about the least fashionable person I know, but this limited edition packaging by Laura Oakes just isn’t doing it for me.  What IS doing it for me, is the fact that it’s celebrating Elemis’ award-winning Papaya Enzyme Peel’s 10th Anniversary by funding vaccinations for children in Africa.

For every product sold, Elemis will provide a 5-in-1 Pentavalent vaccine to immunise a child in Africa against 5 leading diseases and they hope to donate 50,000 vaccines through this programme in partnership with charity SOCO.

Nana would totally approve.

Buy it on counter or online at TimetoSpa.co.uk, priced at £28.60

Inexpensive Beauty Find: Coconut Exfoliating Bar by Wembe

Posted by Lipglossiping On September - 6 - 2011

Well, crack one open (between my thighs) and send me to the tropics because I think I might need today’s inexpensive beauty find in my life.

Wembe is an organic soap company hailing from Brooklyn and the brand have just launched into the UK market!

I love the sound of their Coconut Exfoliating Bar which promises to combine gentle exfoliation from two types of coconut pulp, whilst leaving your skin soft and supple thanks to a blend of rich essential oils and moisturising butters.

Ingredients: Cupassu butter (Theobroma grandiflorum), Sodium Salts from Vegetable Oils, Coconut oil (Cocus nucifera), Coconut Pulp ( Cocus nucifera)

Priced reasonably at £5.85 ensures that this Vegan body treat stays on my radar for a little while longer.

Moroccan Black Soap: a.k.a The Blob

Posted by Lipglossiping On June - 19 - 2011

We’ve christened my tub of Moroccan Black Soap “The Blob”.  Well, Mr. L did… I wouldn’t have been so stupid.  Everybody knows “The Blob” was pink.

I’m not entirely sure why I own this, I was at a Moroccan restaurant the week before last and when I went to the bathroom to wash my hands… I happened upon this earthenware bowl of black slime.  Being a country girl, I was a bit confused until I read the little sign positioned helpfully above the bowl informing me that the ‘goo’ was infact Moroccan Black Soap.  Anti-bacterial, moisturising and all that good stuff.

I went a bit Veruca Salt after this and decided that I absolutely must have some of my own black goo and thus did some googling when I got home.

Et Voila.  Goo.

Goo!

It only requires a small amount to build a bit of lather… it doesn’t lather quite in the traditional way, it’s more of a creamy texture with a good amount of slip.  It smells delightfully clean thanks to the Eucalyptus oil and pairs masterfully with a steamy, hot shower.  I can imagine this being a delight if you’ve got a bit of a cold or stuffy nose.

It washes well and leaves my skin feeling clean and conditioned.  Not enough to forego moisturiser but I don’t find it drying.  I should mention that I don’t use this on my face though.

I purchased my Moroccan Black Soap from AromaVille on eBay.  Admit it.  You want some goo now too.

Elemis Tri-Enzyme Resurfacing Gel Mask

Posted by Lipglossiping On June - 22 - 2010

Enzyme: A protein (or protein-based molecule) that speeds up a chemical reaction in a living organism. An enzyme acts as catalyst for specific chemical reactions, converting a specific set of reactants (called substrates) into specific products. Without enzymes, life as we know it would not exist.

Impressive, but why would you wanna put ’em on your face?

Enzymes are a great exfoliator… it’s a bit more scientific than grabbing at some oatmeal and giving your face a scrub.  Enzymes work by chemically loosening the glue-like substance that binds the upper cells on your face.  These upper cells are dead, and their only reason for existing on your face is to provide protection from the elements.  Obviously, that’s an important function in itself… but they pile up unevenly on your skin’s surface over time, giving an overall dull and uneven texture.

As you get older, your skin’s ability to rejuvenate it’s cells begins to slow down… rejuvenation is the key to a smooth, even complexion.  Without rejuvenation, that layer of dead cells gets thicker and thicker, making the skin appear duller.

So, now we know what enzymes are, it makes sense to slather your face in something that is proven to “speed up chemical reaction in a living organism”. no?

Let’s bust some dead skin cells!

Enter Elemis Tri-Enzyme Resurfacing Gel Mask

Elemis say that their Tri-Enzyme Resurfacing Gel Mask contains:

Amazonian Acerola Cherry, White Truffle Poria Cocos, Great Burdock, Erysimum and amino acids.

Yum!  I can’t decide whether I’d benefit more from eating it!

I jest… although it does smell ah-mazing.

There’s also mention of patented tri-enzyme technology… I’m not sciencey enough to give you the full low-down on this, but it basically means (google is my friend) that Elemis’ Tri-Enzyme products contain three enzymes (Subtilisine, Protease and Papain).  These are the work-horses in the formula, and Papain is an enzyme found in papaya.  How good am I at googling, seriously?

So anyway, now that I’ve finished with the theory behind the product… does it do anything?

I accepted this for review consideration because I’ve generally loved everything I’ve ever bought from the brand, and had heard great things about this product in particular.  Though I must admit, I was also a bit nervous about using it.  You’ve heard me go on about my redness and sensitive skin before, and I was worried that I would experience additional irritation from using this product.

There was no need.  I find Elemis Tri-Enzyme Resurfacing Gel Mask really pleasant to use, despite warnings of a powerful tingling sensation.  I feel a tingle… but less than most lip plumpers I’ve used.  If anything, it’s quite a refreshing, cooling sensation.

I wash my face and ensure that my skin is patted dry.  Dispensing about three pumps of the Tri-Enzyme mask, I spread it evenly over my face, avoiding the eye and mouth areas.  Then I go and put my feet up, or um… ok, in reality I go on Twitter.  10 minutes later, off I trot to the bathroom where a sink of warm water awaits me to wash the gel off.  It doesn’t harden or crack and is easy to rinse away.

It took 4 sessions (I’m using it twice a week) before I started to notice any real difference.  It claims to improve skin smoothness, decrease the appearance of fine lines, blemishes and uneven skin tone.  I dunno about all that but I’m definitely noticing a difference in the texture of my skin.  I had some rough patches on my forehead and nose that foundation would cling to… these have disappeared.

I hesitate to include the following observation (simply because it’s a real big deal for me) but I’m also sure that my redness has faded a little.  Now, in all honesty… I don’t understand this, it was the last thing I expected to see an improvement with.  The treatment room manager at Liz Earle mentioned inflammation as a possible cause for my redness, so I’m wondering if there’s something in the Tri-Enzyme mask that’s reducing inflammation.  I should stop, because I’m totally hypothesising on this.  All I know is that I’m not concealing my cheeks with pan-stick at the moment.  They’re looking rosy rather than red.

One last thing that I’ve noticed an improvement with is my pore size.  I know that nothing can physically reduce pore-size, but I think that sloughing off the top dead layers of skin has had the effect of revealing my true pore size, which is definitely smaller than they previously appeared.  Sadly, it’s done nothing for my nose pores or congestion in that area.  I also haven’t noticed any decrease in fine lines.

I don’t think it’s some miracle anti-aging product.  But I think that it’s wonderful at sloughing away god knows how much dull crap from the surface of your face.

So why not grab your St. Ives Apricot scrub and be done with it?  Honestly, I don’t know… what I do know is that I’ve been using a facial scrub twice a week in the shower for over 7 months and haven’t come even close to the results that this has taken 3 weeks to achieve.

Yeah, I like it.  A lot.

You can purchase Elemis’ Tri-Enzyme Resurfacing Gel Mask (£45) from the TimeToSpa website, alternatively (and more of a bargain) opt for the Elemis Tri-Enzyme Resurfacing System (£45) which not only includes a full-size mask, but also mini-sizes of the facial wash, night cream and a cleansing mitt.

Oh, oh!  One last thing, I nearly forgot… remember I said about those top dead layers protecting the skin from the elements?  Well…. yeah, if you do use this – be sure to be super vigilant with sun protection (and I’m not talking factor 5), wear a hat… slip-slop-slap and all that.  Your face will thank you for it.

RANDOM

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